Suck on this metafilter-Yankees Suck | MetaFilter

I was passed a link with all these charts; here are the interesting ones. Wednesday, January 13, Guest Post by E. This came to me out of nowhere, unbidden. The author knows about the subject deeply, having seen the changes that have barreled through the online world from the s to now. So, as Jimboob would say.

Suck on this metafilter

Suck on this metafilter

Suck on this metafilter

Why doesn't anyone pitch high-density housing? I just find blithe comments that suggest that markets are universally the worst to Suck on this metafilter tiresome, when it seems like this is one particular instance of the market having a lot of issues. Get an ad-free experience with special benefits, and directly support Reddit. Thus Tanning beds dallas used is basically turning into "I could live in SF, but why? For me, it's all about imagining where people are going to Suck on this metafilter to it.

Boyand girl fuck films. What is your fondest memory from MetaFilter?

Wry and metafiltr, but done with a love for the Suck on this metafilter. Couldn't really care about Petra's situation when compared to Jane's in megafilter one. But if pokeweed is so toxic DoveMedwhy did people start eating it in the first place? A slingshot and a fishing pole can get you feet up, celebrating and exploring the last Suck on this metafilter frontier NPR article and 8 minute videojust like Dr. Do it the other way, blowing in, and the same problem occurs, but mixed metafi,ter a small portion of Female rash genitals warmer inside air. I haven't seen those turning into megathreads, either by number of comments or by straying into varied topics. The demon horse picture come to life is Niednagel's best work all season. So when a full-console third installment was announced last September, people lost their metaiflter. Fan Metafiltwr. While learning English, I shed pieces of my old self and language in order to assimilate. Some union officials may become de facto leaders and be put in a position to negotiate terms provided the leadership did not oppose the strike action and lose legitimacy in the eyes of the strikers ". I worry about getting caught up in a "ban politics vs. Well, you're way behind on Six Minutesbut they're all pretty short starting at, obviously, six minutes, but getting a Suck on this metafilter bigger as the story grows. They all bounce off each other naturally, having been friends for years.

Rooting for the Yankees is like rooting for small pox.

  • Tulsi Gabbard.
  • Question came up in a discussion a couple months ago, and I remain at the same level of "I get the idea, but firm nope" I was at in that conversation.
  • The other day I wrote about qualifying new members and the idea of making it harder for people to register on your community.

Lots of tracks? A few well-selected tracks? Genre-hopping, or themed? Music that might have been on the radio before but that I think is good versus music that hasn't been anywhere but college radio yet? I'm doing my first MeFiSwap, and I don't want to be that guy.

You know, the one whose mix sucks. I think you should just fill it up with your honest to god favourite music and damn the consequences. I loathe mixes that just jump from track to track without any real connection. Put songs that work with each other together i. I don't know what kind of mix you're going for, so I can't recommend what you should do with it.

If you're looking for a theme, I'm very partial to the idea of a 'quintessential now' mix--those songs that for whatever reason you cannot stop listening to right now. Chances are, that if you have an mp3 player or some similar set-up, you have such a playlist and it's a mish-mash of things. I think if you like a lot of pitchfork indie your chances of it being appreciated are higher. Man, don't be so neurotic about it.

Put songs that you like on it. Maybe come up with a theme, and use songs that go with that theme. See the first few chapters of Nick Hornsby's "High Fidelity" for a good primer.

For me, it's all about imagining where people are going to listen to it. So you don't want to be abrasive with transitions from soft to metal, and you want to be lively enough to be interesting without being dominant. But if you're making this for strangers, go with dydecker's advice. Make your playlist and then listen to it before burning it to CD. Make certain that it flows well and that the volume level on the songs is relatively OK. If you're making it for somebody else, be sure that it has a nice mix of songs by artists they like and songs by artists they may not have ever heard of.

The art and packaging is really the big thing. Handmade booklets and clever cases go a long, long way in the appreciation of a mix CD. This harks back to the day of the mixtape Packaging gets you major kudos. Resist the urge to fill up the entire 80 minutes. Remember that Exile on Mainstreet was a sprawling double album masterpeice, and it clocked in at under 70 minutes.

Unless you've got a great vibe going, or are making some kind of functional CD, I think minutes is a good limit. By fucntional, I mean a dance mix, or sleep mix, or anything where the music will fade into the background. Here's a little formula I follow: first song must kick ass, and be short. Two has to somehow top that. Track three should be the best song on the mix, and follow naturally from two.

Track four is your chance to bring it back down, using a longer song. After that, you're on your own. I neurose about my mix CDs far too much, too.

In the end, I put an eclectic mix of obscure, old and brand-spanking new a lesser known Little Richard I love next to a track from TMBG off the brand new album that actually doesn't suck. Also, I do play to my audience. The best mix CDs I've gotten have a good ebb and flow. I'll like anything if I've been led up to it, but don't put, oh, Elton John smack dab next to Tape Beatles.

I'm a fan of indie whiny pitchfork crap, but I loved the CD of French dance pop a friend made for me, so don't sweat it too much, yeah? Flow between tracks is important, but I also make sure that the mix opens with a bang.

That first track has to grab the listener's attention -- it sets the mood and feel of everything to follow. Be sure to listen to the mix in its entirety before the final burn. Try to imagine yourself as a listener who has maybe never heard these songs before.

Don't be afraid to cut some songs, even if they're your favourites. The mix isn't for you, after all. And don't feel you need to fill all 80 minutes of the disc, as tempting though it may be. I usually finish a mix with a closing track that is a little slower, quieter, sweeter, or slightly funny. It's the dessert, after all.

Per andifsohow's comment, here's what Rob had to say at the end of "High Fidelity," the movie: "You gotta kick off with a killer, to grab attention. There are a lot of rules. Like any regular album, don't fall into a groove of downers, but don't overstimulate with up-beat catchy pop. Pick your absolute favourite songs ever or of right now and then sort them in a manner that is smooth and not jittery. By smooth I mean that you should not jump from fast to slow and fast again.

Go low to medium to high tempo or vice versa making stops in between and mixing it up a little bit. This is by no means a formula, but a loose framework that is begging to be altered in some small or big way. Oh, and I very rarely include two songs by the same artist. But sometimes I do. Things I like in a mix-tape: -One song that's pure nostalgia -One song that's unexpected -At least two songs I've never heard before -At least one song that's radio-popular -One lesser-known song by an artist I like Assorted other to fill.

I'd like to support those who have said flow is important. The best way I could put it is that the mix is the soundtrack to some sort of party. The theme of the mix should also be the theme of the party.

The differences in songs adjacent to one another must be subtle. Super bonus points if you include songs that reference each other in some way. Sometimes contrast is good, even stark contrast; but don't overdo it. Use it to break things up a little. And play with transitions; sometimes a sudden switch between two songs no pause works really well; sometimes it may need up to 10s.

And don't be afraid to crop songs and mix things together, if you're that gung-ho I tend to take mixes very seriously. Audacity can work for rough mixing if you're willing. What makes a good mix CD, in general terms? Must include Haddaway's "What Is Love. What I have done in the past is to tell a bit of a story through the songs Themed cds tend to hold up better over time than "here is a bunch of music which I like!

See Tiny Mix Tapes for some excellent themed mix ideas. Check out Art of the Mix for some ideas. I find that themed mixes that jump between styles and genres are somewhat hard to sit down and listen to, even if the theme is really clever.

Wish I could give credit for that one but I don't have it in front of me. I appreciate mixes of unusual or obscure styles of music i. Bollywood for the Skeptical. Not sure if you doing the type of mix that may involve beat matching There have been plenty of great mixes without beat-matching, but there are no great mixes with sloppy, 'shoes in the dryer' beat-matching.

If you really want to make a mix cd that's a moving, whole experience, and not just a collection of songs, you need to tell a story, and I don't mean with words. Making a songs about 'x' mix cd is too easy, and too cute. Don't load overload your mix with vocals. For the tracks that do have vocals, try to choose songs that have vocalists that sound similar. If the vocalists sound too different from each other, it makes the whole thing sound schizophrenic and random. Load up the beginning of the cd with slower tempo songs and gradually increase the tempo as the CD goes on.

In addition, you need to pay attention to 'energy levels', which i'll loosely define as how much 'stuff' is going on in the song, which may or may not be related to the tempo.

You generally want to increase the energy level as the cd goes on, but you can vary that, if you like. Use contrasts in structure. If you have a song that goes a long time without a drumbeat, play a non-stop banging tune directly before it to build tension.

If you have a song that's really complex melodically, play something that's very simple, even monotonous in front of it. This is where the story of your mix comes from.

Use contrasts in mood -- Don't make your whole cd happy or sad, or entirely discordant or 'pretty'. Mix it up, if you want to end on a happy note, make sure you mix in plenty of melancholy and minor keys before you get there. Use similarities in sounds-- Try to find tracks with similar sounds next to each other-- tracks with heavily reverbed noisy guitar together, or tracks with plinky acoustic guitar together. It kind of places your cd into a single psycho-acoustic space instead of being a collection of random bands even if they were all recorded by different bands, in completely different times I always like to start and end my cds on very similar notes, even sometimes the same song.

I haven't started it yet because I just found out about it the other day when I took my cats Helena and Cosima to the vet; the receptionist had made a note to tell me about it. Super Ordinary and The Van aren't as horror-oriented as those, but they also explore mental health through the genre lens of superpowers. Last year it was Saga, this year we're starting off with Bitch Planet. October 9 verstegan has a great answer for divabat's question Why do magic wands look the way they do? I like Warm Regards.

Suck on this metafilter

Suck on this metafilter. October 21

About 10 minutes into episode 1 it was already on the "podcasts I can't listen to at work without laughing out loud" list.

I don't have anyone else to share this with but the Empty Bowl podcast is supposed to be relaxing but I find it incredibly stressful for some reason. I'm a big McElroy fan and have a lot of anxiety so i was happy when it came out but something about just thinking about something as stupid as cereal that much stresses me out.

Maybe it's because I think cereal is something that's bad to eat, tastes bad, bad mouthfeel, bad for you, I just don't understand any of it. That's probably why. I've been really enjoying NPR's Code Switch podcast lately and wrote a bit about some of the recent episodes in the POC-only thread - wish they were easier to link!

As for the Empty Bowl, omg bleep I have the opposite reaction - it's my go-to "feel soothed enough by podcast chat I can't feel interested enough in to stay awake for" sleeping aid because it's so relaxing to me. I can't listen to it during the day because it immediately makes me want to take a nap, which is nothing against Justin's banter ability, as I'm an avid listener of MBMBaM and various other McElroy family products.

It's probably related to how I have zero interest in eating any of the cereals discussed in the show and haven't eaten cereal of any sort in ages , which I think makes hearing about the minutiae of cereal activate the "ah, pleasant nonsense" part of my brain, putting me at ease.

I don't listen to a lot of fiction podcasts - I think Welcome to Night Vale was the only one, and I dropped away from that a while back. My current faves are Shedunnit , on golden age mysteries a topic I love and a podcast I find very soothing , Words to That Effect , which I found via Shedunnit, and Decoder Ring , about cultural oddities.

That's not even close to all of them. I may have a problem. Thanks for all the recommendations - thank goodness my new phone has g of storage! Well researched, well told; even if you aren't a fan of country music you will love this podcast. Season 1 is out and Season 2 is coming soon. Funny, smart, profane. Listen to the live episodes if you only have time for a few. Just started listening to this but it seems great. Come for the blinking, stay for the spy? Heartwarming, heartbreaking, funny, sad - it's everything.

I am always listening to lots of In Our Time - it's fascinating during the day, and when I can't sleep, I put it on very low and the sound of thoughtful academics discussing interesting scientific things typically lulls me right to sleep. I'm very dismayed to learn that the PodClub podcasts are ending, and will apparently be removed from the site around the end of the year.

Fortunately, I think I've got a lot of episodes saved. I still listen to Uhh Yeah Dude, since or so. They've been going steadily since February ! I listen to, uh, a lot of podcasts. I especially loved her early series on the Dreyfus affair. Renaissance English History Extremely thorough discussion of the Tudor period, many episodes are 30 min or less. You're welcome. It probably helps to be a Clash fanatic, but I'm really enjoying it.

Bonus: narrated by Chuck D. Podcasts that I have given up on but maybe which you will like: Call Your Girlfriend I had to give up when they slagged off the Girl Scouts. You don't mess with the Girl Scouts. The History of Germany After the other history podcasts, it was just too slapdash and vague.

Still Buffering Supposed to be about adult sisters talking to their still-a-teen sister, but teen sister is in college now and it's just three people chatting. Still kinda interesting, and nice to hear the sisterly giggles. Comedy and scientists.

A great mix! I would like to plug the Strong Songs Podcast. He's very adept at explaining music theory at a fairly basic level which is good because I suck at music theory and describing many of the production techniques that take a simple lick and turn it into a banger.

I don't really do podcasts per se, no long drives or walks etc. There are a few YouTube things that are also podcasts or close enough there's not really anything that needs watching unless you want to see their faces. Hope that's close enough. Still Untitled: Will, Norm, and Adam usually talking about something cool. The Numberphile Podcast. Brady talks to mathematicians.

Citation Needed, from the Technical Difficulties. One of Tom Scott's experiments. Three people sit around and guess things about 'random' Wikipedia articles. You will learn very interesting things with a lot of lol inbetween. But you don't really have to watch three guys just sitting around a table or something. Sadly the 'experiment' has ended. I am also deeply moved by Crackdown and Thunder Bay , but you may wish to avoid if you are not good at crying while driving.

As is extremely on-brand for a Metafilter Socialist, I listen to every single episode of the Current Affairs podcast. I have a deep and somewhat inexplicable love for the low-budget Disney gossip podcast Hidden Mickeys. I also like the Wolverine podcast and Ken Jennings' Omnibus. Can you tell I'm a giant nerd? I enjoy the Dear Prudence podcast but ran into a weird technical difficulty. I was listening to it weekly while I made dinner over the Google Home and at some point the smart speaker stopped recognizing the title.

What the heck google? The women who produce it have read a great deal of self help books for their other podcast and are using their vast knowledge to help a different person out each week with their problems.

I've been pushing Lawfare's The Report podcast on Fanfare because it's extraordinary. There are just so many details in the Mueller Report that went completely unnoticed. Also, any of you who don't listen to the Bugle every week: I don't understand you.

It's the funniest podcast about current events and is a master class in English language use. Futility Closet is a long form spin off of the website. About 25 minutes each episode detailing a forgotten story from the pages of history. Each episode is fairly well reasearched and the website for the pod cast generally has links to the references and often material for further reading.

Each episode is self contained but there will be spoilers always announced at the end of the episode for previous lateral thinking puzzles.

Wait for the next FPP. On Wednesday I was listening to an month old queued podcast while walking to lunch. It happened to announce a live show in my city. Six hours later and travel time plus 4 minutes from the end of a very important ceremonial work event, I saw The Memory Palace live, accompanied by a brass band. It was great. I love that live podcasts are bringing back the traveling public lecture as popular entertainment.

But, both journalism and fiction just seem to pile up this year. I'm a fan and donate to many of them, but I only rarely feel like listening to them lately.

It gives me the same, delightful, "what the hell is this" feeling I had when discovering Joe Frank in the '90s and Blue Jam in the '00s. I'm pretty sure it's this decade's memorable radio for me. Start from the beginning. I recently discovered My Favorite Murder and am working my way through three years of back episodes.

Come for the crime, stay for the empowering female friendship. That said I recently ran across a fiction podcast called Limetown that really drew me in for some reason. Sometimes it feels hyperbolically difficult. Tompkins, Tim Heidecker, et al. Extremities by Wendover Productions just started their second season.

Anyway, each podcast season of Extremities goes deep into talking about the life and world around really unusual places. The writing is top notch, informational but casual and just funny enough to keep you chuckling occasionally and engaged.

Meanwhile the content is just plain fascinating, IMHO. I still want to steal Affable Corporate Executive Marcus Cutter as a supervillain for a story of my own because wow. I'm currently chewing through the Magnus Archives - people keep telling me it gets really good and serialised really soon, but the one-off horror format is a bit grating.

I prefer my storytelling with a plot and continuity. Also, the intro sounds weird out my cats a lot. My favorites: Extra Hot Great. This is about television — not "showbizzy" and not fan-nerdery. Three very personable hosts and a weekly guest. It's got a great format and moves right along. Also, it's very well-recorded. I can't handle poor audio and some speaking voice peculiarities borderline misophonia , and this one is very well done. Wry and biting, but done with a love for the show.

The Blotter Presents. This is a review of true-crime properties books, TV series, films, etc. I get so much ironing done while listening to this -- which is high praise. Fascinating discussion that's engaging even when I haven't seen the pieces they are talking about. From other folks: Dave and Jeb Aren't Mean.

Two guys review and discuss Hallmark movies. Again, they strike a great balance with poking fun at the movies, and also appreciating what they are trying to do. I grew tired of listening to podcasts like How Did This Get Made which, to my ear, just sounded like a bunch of comedians trying to improv one-liners about bad movies, rather than having any insight.

This Had Oscar Buzz. Two extremely knowledgeable hosts talking about the films which seemed headed for Oscar nominations, but came up empty.

I have just been introduced to this podcast and have been inhaling it. Really engaging and entertaining, with just the right amount of "inside baseball" information for my tastes.

And the host is good about asking about the money side—how much did it cost to keep this going, and where did they get the money? No fairy tales and when someone did it with family money or angel investors or their general richness ahem SoulCycle, Glossier , you get the full picture. I'm not much of a podcast fan in general. Plus, that thing where you can tell that two people aren't in the studio together, maybe one of them is skyping in or something and their voices are just different?

Sets my teeth on edge. I had hyperacusis after a crapton of childhood ear infections, and I still have vague Roderick Usher tendencies sometimes.

For some reason, old-time radio shows don't evoke the same stress. Something about the original recording equipment? Anyway, there are a couple I like as long as I don't use headphones. Whenever my sister and I are in the car together, we listen to Judge John Hodgman.

And I enjoy Mousetalgia. The Birthday Game , Richard Osman from Pointless has 3 guests who compete to win a Colin the Caterpillar cake by guessing the age of celebrities who have birthdays that week. I've gotten pretty backed up on podcasts in the last two weeks because I changed jobs and went from a 35 minute commute to a ten minute one so I don't really get through much. I pretty much only listen to film podcasts and political ones. On the film side, Filmspotting is still the gold standard.

Josh and Adam are both two of the best critics around and often have great guests like Michael Phillips or Angelica Jade.

Blank Check doesn't have the deep knowledge of Filmspotting but they have so much enthusiasm that I listen to them a lot. I should like Scott Wienburg's Science vs. Fiction but but I've found it pretty rough going so far. It's new and I'm hoping that the hosts get into a groove because it's a premise for a series that I should love. Their Jupiter ascending episode is a hoot.

How and why to nationalize various industries and services. If you have not yet heard the episode of Overinvested where they review the campaign as "America, season " you are in for a treat.

I like Warm Regards. But bear in mind that everything was punk's mortal enemy, punk being a full-on negation of ALL mainstream culture. So it feels like cherrypicking to just focus on the disco suckage. By the mid's, disco's downfall dovetailed conveniently with the AIDS crisis disco didn't downfall in the mids; that happened in But like every other relevant form of music, it never really died, just laid low, mutated etc. Indeed, if anything the rise of AIDS through the early and mids seemed to coincide with a powerful resurgence in big deal dance floor music You both realize that the 'disco sucks' meme wasn't born fully form in your rural areas like Aphrodite from Zeus' head, right?

I was offering my own experience not to say that there wasn't racism and homophobia, but that that wasn't the whole story. Dorky country kids never get mentioned in the essays, but we were the ones listening to Detroit rock stations and wearing the t-shirts. And for a touch of irony: we all agreed disco sucks, but a lot of us listened to The Electrifying Mojo on late night radio and watched Soul Train on Saturday afternoons.

If someone had told us these things were connected we probably wouldn't have believed them. And the video in the first link might have melted our minds. I'll leave this here to add to procession of marginally relevant things. So if something is -ist for the majority, but not -ist for a minority, it's -ist.

And if it's -ist for a minority , but not -ist for the majority , it's also -ist. Also, since when was prog dethroned by disco as punk's mortal enemy? I'll tell you what happened here. One of the four thousand songs to appropriate the riff from Back In Black which goes with practically everything.

This rises to the level of let me google that for you. Uncle Ira: I'll leave this here to go with the other things that were left here. That is amazing. I love that the language ASL? Since others have contributed their leavings Yo I'm hella stoned but here's some shit: I make a good part of my living in writing disco or what the kids call disco house, but starting from nothing instead of sampling vinyls, so I'm writing and playing live bass and recording live string sections and lyrics from scratch and stuff and its influences work their way into lots of other things I work on because You know, since it's scientifically proven to suck and be tasteless because it was crazy popular 40 years ago and it's too black and too white and too gay and too straight and too much and too little and why does the beard guy sing like a girl and oh god do you have to wear rollerskates to dance to this stuff?

Write disco, get paid! Ask me how. You were there? The whole time? Everywhere disco was happening, even though you didn't like it? Dismissing him out of hand like this only confirms his arguments. But, setting that aside, the issue is simply that you, and your sources, have certain parameters by which the sentiment of a group of people, both racist and non-racist, homophobic and non-homophobic, can be considered "much to do" with racism or homophobia.

Some commenters here have different parameters. It's not really an "I was there, so you're wrong" or "Scholarly researchers have researched, so you're wrong" issue. Can we not just agree that perhaps the initiators of the anti-disco backlash were racists and homophobes, and many people later involved were not?

So yeah, unless you were going to just stay home and read books, you were going to encounter the music they called disco -- on the radio, on TV, in movies, playing in the background at the mall. Looking forward to 30 years from now, when I can read a discussion where people are talking about "the bad old days of '10s dubstep" See what I just said about fragmentation and lack of options.

Hell, in the mid-late 70s, we didn't even have Sony Walkmans yet. You were stuck with the soundtrack that the greater world was imposing whether you wanted it or not, and for an agonizing while, in my comparably progressive town of one million plus, that soundtrack was overwhelmingly disco. That's always going to get my back up, because where I come from, lived experience has to trump retrospective research. Final thought. I don't for a moment want to imply that those times weren't horrifically homophobic.

See what I just said about fragmentation and lack of options. That's why I love revival stuff, because the people who are sick of listening to it nonstop in the greater context of "owning a radio or TV" are out of the equation, and it can become charming again.

I'm just wary of falling in with the wrong crowd of cool kids, where they only like some old thing ironically, then when I "come out of the closet" as actually genuinely enjoying it and feeling it has legit redeeming qualities, they're like "you can't be serious". Oh, I assure you, I'm serious! Listen to those fuckin' bass grooves! Holy shit! People usually think I play the intro to 'Wanted Dead or Alive' ironically. It's interesting to watch their faces morph as I play and sing the whole song, including the solo, with actual emotion.

I recall hating Disco for the music and no other reason. I graduated high school in right at the peak of Disco and race and sexuality had zero to do with my disliking it. It simply seemed weak and repetitive and I hated the ultra-ubiquitous white,male Bee Gees and wondered what happened to the Sex Pistols who released that cool record in ' A couple years later the world swung over to my way of thinking.

Pin on Places I want to go

Sure, it's a massive time suck, but think of the savings! The posting was picked up by CityLab , and is leading to some interesting discussions. This idea of mega-commuting has been discussed before including this New Yorker article from which was inspired by recent data from the US Census Bureau , and previously here, On.

You've got your choice between bus, hourly air shuttle, or train. Wasn't this done in reverse for people working on nuclear programs out in the desert? I can't remember the details, but I swear there was some top secret thing going on out in the desert somewhere and all the employees would be flown out on daily charter flights from where they all lived in LA or wherever. My father had a super long commute for a number of years; they lived outside Danbury, CT and he worked in the Philadelphia suburbs.

They couldn't move for a variety of reasons, so he'd drive out Sunday night, stay the week in a hotel which the company paid for, amazingly , and drive home Friday. Of course, as soon as they were able to move to Philly to be closer to his job they laid him off. In Sam Cookney wrote a blog post that went viral in which he calculated that it would be cheaper to live in Barcelona and commute to London 4 days a week, than to live in London.

Then, this August, it turned out he had actually put it into practice. He now commutes from Barcelona to London, although not 4 days a week. My husband has a "megacommute" - 75 miles each direction, takes right about 75 minutes - but for a different reason than the articles mention: We live in a small city in downstate Illinois approximately an hour from several other small cities Peoria, Springfield, Bloomington, Urbana, Quad Cities, etc.

It's a large enough population to support a steady career advancement IF you can move among cities as jobs open up. When we bought our house my husband lived 3 miles from work and bike commuted But we're weighing factor like the economic costs of moving, the social costs of losing our network of friends here, the emotional costs of changing the kids' schools, the environmental and physical costs of my husband's long commute.

And setting that against job opportunities for him, and me. I never thought we'd have such a long commute situation for so long, but its a very complicated decision! On the plus side its all highway driving on pretty empty highways, no traffic, and so many people do it that he's always been in a carpool, and on days he doesn't drive he knocks off all his email before he gets to the office. Some employers State Farm run a shuttle van, which is nice.

There's no intercity train, though except Springfield to Normal , and the buses run for the convenience of college students, not commuters. And given how many of their employees do this, I find employers in the region weirdly resistant to telecommuting. The one thing I do find amusing is that all the Peoria to Springfield commuters know each others' cars and plates because they're the only cars on the highway.

They run into each other at Costco and theyre like, "Oh, I didn't see you all week, I wondered if you were sick! Is that a really long while over there? I know the distance is but Just about everyone I know who commutes from Brooklyn to Queens or from south Brooklyn to upper Manhattan has a solid mins each way. Also I've known people who had 2-hr one-way commutes from the suburbs into downtown LA but uh nothing about commuting in LA was short of psychotic so.

It was the bay areas's sky-high real estate back years ago was the main prompting of Henry George developing his argument. Decent inter-city passenger trains makes this sort of thing much less exceptional. Not that commuting by any means other than chauffeur-driven limo is much fun.

Anyone who owns a home there enow should be quitting their jobs and lobbying for it full time for the chance to sell their house to some Bay Area or LA commuter who decides to live there and take HSR in to work. My friend's dad commuted from Los Angeles to the bay area when I was little, but quickly ended up getting a room in a small shared house in Los Gatos and living there during the week, and just flying down for the weekends to see his family.

I think the temptation to grab a night here and there on friends' couches would be pretty high after a long day's work. Eyebrows' story suggests a world where we never leave our battlemech-style commute armor and learn to recognize each other by clan insignia and weapons scoring.

Bright side, we'll all be pedestrians. Just, some of us will deal better with the occasional caliber fusillade. Forgot to reload the shoulder racks last night. Had to straight punch a guy to get him out of my parking space. It was that or a micro-winder right there in the garage. You should see him. Well, take it easy, there, big fella. Those gauntlets are only soft-target rated. I just get so mad.

I've heard the argument that North America couldn't support the European level of railroad infrastructure How can the US hope to stay competitive when there's such a cost barrier to working in the hotspots? Sounds like burb claves, all right. Interesting, although my time is worth a lot of money to me, so this wouldn't work. We have a lot of rail but it's used by passenger and freight and freight takes precedence which means delays frequently.

And the cost is rather expensive. Because they don't have enough people who ride. Because of delays and stuff. So it goes on I know a lot of people who commute weekly, flying or driving Sunday night or at a horribly early hour on Monday, staying all week, and heading home on Friday. There are all the usual reasons of modern family life -- the two body problem, child custody arrangements, caring for elderly family members, or being upside down in a house -- that make fully moving to another place difficult or impossible, and the costs of the commute and either a motel or a cheap rental aren't usually prohibitive.

To have a daily flight commute, though, you'd have to have a job that was ok with you being late whenever the plane is delayed, which on some routes can be frequent, plus the costs of getting to and from the airport at each end. Hello and welcome to my life. Circumstances have put me into this situation off and on for close to twenty years and I am beyond sick of it.

I've been putting a lot of work into being able to change careers and hopefully I'll be in a position to do that next year sometime. It's about a four hour trip by car each way and, believe me, never being able to kick back and relax on a Sunday night because you've got to drive for hundreds of miles is horrible. Weekends are filled with dread knowing that the drive is coming up soon.

Eventually, it can start to feel like you don't live anywhere. The only thing that can stop a bad guy in a titanium commuter mech with depleted uranium ammo and wide-spectrum targeting array is a good guy in a titanium commuter mech with depleted uranium ammo, wide-spectrum targeting array, and the new Flaming Reciprocity of Jesus XL hardpoints kit, only in this year's Chevrolet.

This is why I predict that the advent of the robot car will destroy the popularity of neo-urbanism and cause a renaissance of suburbia and sprawl. For a while, I had a house and spouse in Dallas while I had a gig in Austin. We did the weekend commute thing for about 6 months before I just got too weary of it. But if there were high speed rail between the major cities, I would be all about working wherever. But rail in Texas is a sad approximation of real trains. Example, I can drive to Austin in about 4 hours if traffic is normal levels of nightmare.

To take the train would be 1. There is no real mass transit in the south, and I'm willing to bet there are significant racial historic reasons. With no easy transit, your serfs and sharecroppers aren't going to travel to find better lives and jobs, you have a built in class of low wage workers that can't easily escape the agricultural quicksand. I have a strong sense that this presupposes that your non-work time is of no value.

If that's true, and you've made that choice, fine. But if not, maybe that should cause you to look inward. In other words, we have alot of inadequate trackage, still owned by railroads, who grudgingly grant limited rights to passenger services. Doesn't sound workable. It made sense years ago to grant land to RR corporations for trackage when the continent needed linking and new opportunities tapped. It's now an impediment to further growth; alot of that trackage around cities should return to government and managed like highways are.

I don't see a downside to this, but I am a confirmed train nut. The robot car could work for urban types, too. Especially if you never need to buy a car, which reduces the cost of living in the city. Just call for a self-driving vehicle whenever you need to go out.

I think they may resist this for the same reason that other people resist gentrification: because where you see an opportunity to sell their houses and make money, they see forces that will drive them from their homes and destroy their communities.

Basically a tank with an autopilot, active point defense, heavy armor, bed, fridge, kettle, and toilet. Mutual antipathy will mean that drivers and pedestrians will only speak to each other through a mediator caste of cyclists, who are despised by both groups for the way they gunk up the treads, weave on and off sidewalks, and occasionally plant limpet mines while riding past.

The tech industry in the Bay Area is using geography to institute a tightly controlled quasi-guild system. The only way you can afford to live in the Bay Area is if you are invited there to work for tech industry money. Doctors have managed to drive up their salaries through using certification processes and credentialing organizations to limit supply; the tech industry doesn't have those institutional apparatuses in place, and so it uses control over territory instead.

Bay Area rents aren't stratospheric just because of high market demand. The real question then becomes where to store your stuff over the weekend. Of course! That's why all of my old neighbours in Santa Clara are Indian, Chinese, and Japanese and we're renting our condo to a Brazillian couple. I have an idea: once everyone has their own robot car let's figure out some way to join all of them together in a really long chain to standardize the movement in a safe and efficient way, oh wait Actually we could do some kind of temporary tether for long commutes, micro-trains that "magnetize" off and on during the routes, write it down if nobody has yet..

I also know people who pay a few hundred bucks to pitch tents in backyards. I'm starting to suspect that only reason this seems even remotely economically plausible is because the price of gas is so artificially low. This is a gigantic pile of money. High speed rail is indeed a game changer.

It's not always due to high rent prices in large cities or better quality of life in the countryside.

Suck on this metafilter